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Psychobiology of Perceived Effort During Physical Tasks

de Morree, Helma M. and Marcora, Samuele Maria (2015) Psychobiology of Perceived Effort During Physical Tasks. In: Handbook of Biobehavioral Approaches to Self-Regulation. Springer New York, New York, NY, pp. 255-270. ISBN 978-1-4939-1235-3. E-ISBN 978-1-4939-1236-0. (doi:10.1007/978-1-4939-1236-0_17) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:60790)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-1236-0_17

Abstract

Perception of effort is the conscious sensation of the effort exerted during a physical task, and it is one of the subjective experiences that accompany voluntary actions. Perception of effort has an important role in the self-regulation of behavior. In physical tasks requiring endurance, perception of effort is one of the main determinants of pacing and performance and it is one of the barriers that prevent sedentary individuals from adopting an active lifestyle. Furthermore, high perception of effort is one of the main features of the disabling fatigue affecting patients with cancer and other medical conditions. The afferent feedback model postulates that perception of effort arises from sensory signals produced by peripheral receptors (e.g., group III–IV afferents). According to the corollary discharge model, perception of effort arises from corollary discharges of the central motor command to the working muscles (including the respiratory muscles). Current electrophysiological evidence, showing that motor-related brain activity correlates with perception of effort, corroborates the corollary discharge model of perception of effort. Preliminary evidence from neuroimaging studies suggests that the cingulate and insular cortices, and possibly the thalamus and precuneus, are brain areas that might be involved in perception of effort. Future research should focus on targets for interventions aimed at reducing perception of effort. Such interventions might benefit athletes involved in endurance performance, patients suffering from fatigue, and sedentary individuals wishing to adopt a more active lifestyle.

Item Type: Book section
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/978-1-4939-1236-0_17
Uncontrolled keywords: Central motor command; Corollary discharge; Electroencephalogram; Exercise; Motor-related cortical potential; Neurophysiology; Perception of effort; Perceived exertion; Performance; Physical activity
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Samuele Marcora
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2017 19:12 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:43 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/60790 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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