Skip to main content

Respiratory frequency is strongly associated with perceived exertion during time trials of different duration

Nicolò, Andrea, Marcora, Samuele Maria, Sacchetti, Massimo (2016) Respiratory frequency is strongly associated with perceived exertion during time trials of different duration. Journal of sports sciences, 34 (13). pp. 1199-1206. ISSN 1466-447X. (doi:10.1080/02640414.2015.1102315) (KAR id:60786)

PDF Author's Accepted Manuscript
Language: English
Download (334kB) Preview
[thumbnail of Nicolò et al._2016_JSS.pdf]
Preview
This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.
Request an accessible format
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02640414.2015.1102315

Abstract

In order to provide further insight into the link between respiratory frequency (fR) and the rating of perceived exertion (RPE), the present study investigated the effect of exercise duration on perceptual and physiological responses during self-paced exercise. Nine well-trained competitive male cyclists (23 ± 3 years) performed a preliminary incremental ramp test and three randomised self-paced time trials (TTs) differing in exercise duration (10, 20 and 30 min). Both RPE and fR increased almost linearly over time, with a less-pronounced rate of increase when absolute exercise duration increased. However, when values were expressed against relative exercise duration, no between-trial differences were found in either RPE or fR. Conversely, between-trial differences were observed for minute ventilation (.VE), .VO2 and heart rate (HR), when values were expressed against relative exercise duration. Unlike the relationship between RPE and both .VE and HR, the relationship between RPE and fR was not affected by exercise duration. In conclusion, fR, but not .VE, HR or [.VO2, shows a strong relationship to RPE and a similar time course, irrespective of exercise duration. These findings indicate that fR is the best correlate of RPE during self-paced exercise, at least among the parameters and for the range of durations herein investigated.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/02640414.2015.1102315
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Natural Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Samuele Marcora
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2017 18:51 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:43 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/60786 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year