Video Methods, Green Cultural Criminology, and the Anthropocene: SANCTUARY as a Case Study

Redmon, David (2018) Video Methods, Green Cultural Criminology, and the Anthropocene: SANCTUARY as a Case Study. Deviant Behavior, 39 (4). pp. 495-511. ISSN 0163-9625. E-ISSN 1521-0456. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/01639625.2017.1407110) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
https://doi.org/10.1080/01639625.2017.1407110

Abstract

Documentary criminology is a burgeoning, open-ended methodological technique that crafts and depicts sensuous knowledge from the lived experiences of crime, transgression, and harm. This ‘video ethnography paper’ examines my 74 minute documentary, SANCTUARY, as a case study to demonstrate how documentary criminology draws upon green cultural criminology, video methods, and sensory studies to provide an experiential understanding of crime (in this case, against donkeys) and rehabilitation in the contested notion of an ‘anthropocene’ epoch. I trace how documentary criminology can evoke and enact the lived experiences of “donkey rehabilitation” as sensuous scholarship.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Criminology
Depositing User: David Redmon
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2017 15:20 UTC
Last Modified: 13 Apr 2018 15:37 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/60672 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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