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Chimpanzee Personality and the Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1A Genotype

Wilson, V. A. D., Weiss, A., Humle, Tatyana, Morimura, N., Udono, T., Idani, G., Matsuzawa, T., Hirata, S., Inoue-Murayama, M. (2016) Chimpanzee Personality and the Arginine Vasopressin Receptor 1A Genotype. Behavior Genetics, . pp. 1-12. ISSN 0001-8244. E-ISSN 1573-3297. (doi:10.1007/s10519-016-9822-2) (KAR id:60187)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10519-016-9822-2

Abstract

Polymorphisms of the arginine vasopressin receptor 1a (AVPR1a) gene have been linked to various measures related to human social behavior, including sibling conflict and agreeableness. In chimpanzees, AVPR1a polymorphisms have been associated with traits important for social interactions, including sociability, joint attention, dominance, conscientiousness, and hierarchical personality dimensions named low alpha/stability, disinhibition, and negative emotionality/low dominance. We examined associations between AVPR1a and six personality domains and hierarchical personality dimensions in 129 chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) living in Japan or in a sanctuary in Guinea. We fit three linear and three animal models. The first model included genotype, the second included sex and genotype, and the third included genotype, sex, and sex × genotype. All personality phenotypes were heritable. Chimpanzees possessing the long form of the allele were higher in conscientiousness, but only in models that did not include the other predictors; however, additional analyses suggested that this may have been a consequence of study design. In animal models that included sex and sex × genotype, chimpanzees homozygous for the short form of the allele were higher in extraversion. Taken with the findings of previous studies of chimpanzees and humans, the findings related to conscientiousness suggest that AVPR1a may be related to lower levels of impulsive aggression. The direction of the association between AVPR1a genotype and extraversion ran counter to what one would expect if AVPR1a was related to social behaviors. These results help us further understand the genetic basis of personality in chimpanzees.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s10519-016-9822-2
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Depositing User: Tatyana Humle
Date Deposited: 03 Feb 2017 12:37 UTC
Last Modified: 22 Jan 2020 04:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/60187 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Humle, Tatyana: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1919-631X
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