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Dual Routes from Social Identity to Collective Opposition against Criminal Organisations: Intracultural Appropriation Theory and the roles of Honour Codes and Social Change Beliefs

Travaglino, Giovanni A., Abrams, Dominic, Russo, Giuseppina (2017) Dual Routes from Social Identity to Collective Opposition against Criminal Organisations: Intracultural Appropriation Theory and the roles of Honour Codes and Social Change Beliefs. Group Processes and Intergroup Relations, 20 (3). pp. 317-332. ISSN 1368-4302. (doi:10.1177/1368430216682351) (KAR id:59726)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1368430216682351

Abstract

Italian criminal organisations (COs) are a serious global threat. Intracultural Appropriation Theory (ICAT) holds that such groups exploit cultural codes of masculinity and honour to legitimise and lower resistance to their actions. Such codes are an important feature of Southern Italian group membership. A large survey (N = 1173) investigated the role of two previously under-examined facets of honour cultures – personal concerns for reputation, and female honour ideology. In addition, drawing on social identity theory, and testing a dual route hypothesis, this research investigated the role of beliefs about the necessity of social change in the articulation between identification, honour, and collective action intentions. Consistent with ICAT, and with previous research, male-honour related values uniquely predicted collective action intentions against criminal organisations. In addition, consistent with the dual route hypothesis: a) regional identification positively predicted social change beliefs which in turn explained stronger intentions to oppose COs collectively, and, b) regional identification was also positively associated with masculine honour which in turn predicted weaker intentions to oppose COs. The evidence supports the idea that social identity can have opposing effects on collective action in the same context, depending on which beliefs are mobilised.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1177/1368430216682351
Uncontrolled keywords: collective action, facets of honour, masculine honour, omertà, reputation, social change beliefs
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Giovanni Travaglino
Date Deposited: 15 Dec 2016 14:36 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:40 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/59726 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Travaglino, Giovanni A.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4091-0634
Abrams, Dominic: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2113-4572
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