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Perfectionistic concerns predict increases in adolescents’ anxiety symptoms: A three-wave longitudinal study

Damian, Lavinia E., Negru-Subtirica, Oana, Stoeber, Joachim, B?ban, Adriana (2017) Perfectionistic concerns predict increases in adolescents’ anxiety symptoms: A three-wave longitudinal study. Anxiety, Stress, & Coping, 30 (5). pp. 551-561. ISSN 1061-5806. E-ISSN 1477-2205. (doi:10.1080/10615806.2016.1271877)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10615806.2016.1271877

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Although perfectionism has been proposed to be a risk factor for the development of anxiety, research on perfectionism and anxiety symptoms in adolescents is scarce and inconclusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the two higher-order dimensions of perfectionism—perfectionistic strivings and perfectionistic concerns—predict the development and maintenance of anxiety symptoms. An additional aim of the present study was to examine potential reciprocal effects of anxiety symptoms predicting increases in perfectionism. Design: The study used a longitudinal design with three waves spaced 4-5 months apart. Methods: A non-clinical sample of 489 adolescents aged 12-19 years completed a paper-and-pencil questionnaire. Results: As expected, results showed a positive effect from perfectionistic concerns to anxiety symptoms, but the effect was restricted to middle-to-late adolescents (16-19 years old): Perfectionistic concerns predicted longitudinal increases in adolescents’ anxiety symptoms whereas perfectionistic strivings did not. Furthermore, anxiety symptoms did not predict increases in perfectionism. Conclusions: Implications for the understanding of the relationship between perfectionism and anxiety symptoms are discussed.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/10615806.2016.1271877
Uncontrolled keywords: perfectionism; anxiety symptoms; adolescents; longitudinal data
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Joachim Stoeber
Date Deposited: 07 Dec 2016 05:44 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:15 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/59519 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Stoeber, Joachim: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6439-9917
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