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What are child care social workers doing in relation to infant mental health: an exploration of professional ideologies and practice preferences within an interagency context

Woodcock Ross, J, Hooper, L, Stenhouse, E, Sheaff, R. (2009) What are child care social workers doing in relation to infant mental health: an exploration of professional ideologies and practice preferences within an interagency context. The British Journal of Social Work, 39 (6). pp. 1008-1025. (doi:10.1093/bjsw/bcn029) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bjsw/bcn029

Abstract

Infancy is a crucial time for interventions to reduce later developmental difficulties. In England, recent policy has required children's service delivery to be redesigned to attend to infant mental health across all four tiers of NHS provision through inter-agency networks of child-care professionals. The policy identifies child-care social workers as primary care professionals, able to recognize early infant mental health problems, promote mental health and prevent deterioration. Our paper explores whether, as a profession, English child-care social workers are well prepared in terms of their knowledge, ideological beliefs and professional acculturation to implement such changes to their practice. Empirical information is provided from a funded, independent evaluation of the implementation of the NSF policy at a local level. Data from professional focus group interviews describe and compare the differing professional ideologies and professional practice preferences within the infant mental health network of an English NHS Primary Care Trust in an urban local authority. The findings identified obstacles that were personal–ideological, cultural and structural in nature. Progress towards achieving the NSF policy standards appeared slight.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1093/bjsw/bcn029
Uncontrolled keywords: Infant; mental health; social work; child; inter-professional working
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Social Policy
Depositing User: Lucie Patch
Date Deposited: 23 Nov 2016 14:19 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 18:16 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/58930 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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