Skip to main content

Heteronormativity and the inverted relationship between socio-political and legislative approaches to lesbian, gay and bisexual hate crime

Duggan, Marian (2016) Heteronormativity and the inverted relationship between socio-political and legislative approaches to lesbian, gay and bisexual hate crime. In: Schweppe, Jennifer and Haynes, Amanda and Taylor, Seamus, eds. Critical Perspectives on Hate Crime: Contributions from the Island of Ireland. Palgrave Hate Studies . Palgrave Macmillan, London, UK, 145 -164. ISBN 978-1-137-52666-3. (KAR id:58882)

PDF
Language: English


Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Download (330kB) Preview
[img]
Preview
XML Word Processing Document (DOCX)
Language: English

Restricted to Repository staff only

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
Contact us about this Publication
[img]
Official URL
https://www.palgrave.com/de/book/9781137526663

Abstract

The Republic of Ireland is under growing pressure to enact hate crime legislation in line with several of its European counterparts, including the UK. The island of Ireland is unusual in that Northern Ireland has had hate crime legislation in place for several years whilst across the border in the Republic, virtually no laws exist to recognise or address crimes based on prejudice or hostility. Useful and symbolic as it can be, criminalisation is often critiqued as warranting a criminal justice response to what may be social - and potentially preventable - issues. The prejudices which are integral to discerning a crime as being motivated by hostility are not innate; they must be somehow learnt and learnt in response to the socially constructed identity which they target. Alternative socio-political (or socio-cultural) approaches to address the prejudices informing hostility against lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) communities have focused on preventative awareness-raising, political engagement. Most recently, socio-political assimilation has been through enhanced legal rights on par with heterosexuals; gains made in relation to marriage equality, healthcare, parenting and employment (in some parts of the UK) are to be commended, yet prejudice remains. Even after a decade of hate crime law, the number of people victimised as a result of their sexual identity remains high and prosecutions low. This chapter evaluates the impact of heternormativity on socio-political and legislative approaches to LGB hate crime to evaluate the efficacy of such approaches in light of the context in which they are situated and what lessons can be imparted to those seeking to implement similar measures.

Item Type: Book section
Uncontrolled keywords: Homophobia, Law, Hate Crime, Victimisation, Ireland
Subjects: H Social Sciences
K Law
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research
Depositing User: Marian Duggan
Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2016 21:36 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 18:16 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/58882 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Duggan, Marian: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8153-7218
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year