How the World’s Interventions in Syria Have Normalised the Use of Force

Bode, Ingvild (2016) How the World’s Interventions in Syria Have Normalised the Use of Force. . blog publication. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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http://theconversation.com/how-the-worlds-interven...

Abstract

Since 2012, the war in Syria has lurched from one escalation to another. Syrians have been subjected to large-scale military force not only by their own government, but also by an array of rebel groups, Islamic State (IS), a US-led coalition and other states. The results have been devastating, as the recent bombing of hospitals illustrates in particular. Most of the international interventions came in the form of air strikes, though this may change if reports that Turkey and Saudi Arabia are contemplating a ground invasion are true. Although these actions have triggered debate in legal circles, their repercussions for the way force is used haven’t got much attention. The interventions in Syria may have deeply affected the norms that define the architecture of global security. Once military force becomes the rule rather than the exception, the general prohibition on the use of force is threatened. This changes established boundaries of what’s permissible, and therefore corrodes one of the core premises of global security in general.

Item Type: Internet publication
Subjects: J Political Science
J Political Science > JZ International relations
K Law > KZ Law of Nations
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations > Conflict Analysis Research Centre
Depositing User: Ingvild Bode
Date Deposited: 17 Nov 2016 14:58 UTC
Last Modified: 18 Nov 2016 10:09 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/58744 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bode, Ingvild: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2815-4533
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