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The impact of a selective entry examination on children's feelings as they approach the transition to secondary school

Skipper, Yvonne, Douglas, Karen (2016) The impact of a selective entry examination on children's feelings as they approach the transition to secondary school. British Educational Research Journal, 42 (6). pp. 945-961. ISSN 1469-3518. (doi:10.1002/berj.3242) (KAR id:58665)

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Abstract

In the current study we examined how different experiences of a secondary school selective entry examination influenced children’s feelings about themselves, school, and intelligence as they approached transition. Children were recruited from three English schools that use a selective entry examination to stream students into secondary schools based on ability (98 children aged around 10) and were assessed at two time points. At Time 1 children had recently decided whether to take the exam, and at Time 2 children had received their exam results. At each time children completed measures of theory of intelligence, locus of control, self-esteem, and feelings about the school system. At Time 1, children who intended to take the exam showed more positive outcomes than those who did not. However, they were also more likely to hold a fixed view of intelligence, which has been associated with longer-term negative outcomes. Similarly at Time 2 children who had passed the exam showed more positive outcomes than those who had failed or had not taken the exam, but again they were more likely to hold a potentially maladaptive fixed view of intelligence. Those who failed the exam were indistinguishable from those who had not taken the exam. These results suggest that passing the selective exam can lead to positive outcomes for children, except in terms of their view of intelligence. However, failing and not being given the opportunity to sit the exam leads to consistently negative outcomes. The potential implications of these results are discussed.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/berj.3242
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Karen Douglas
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2016 12:23 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:15 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/58665 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Douglas, Karen: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0381-6924
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