Evaluation of a pilot service to facilitate discharge of patients with stable long-term mental health needs from secondary to primary care: the role of Primary Care Mental Health Specialists

Hamilton-West, Kate E., Hotham, Sarah, Yang, Wei, Hedayioglu, Julie.A., Brigden, Charlotte L. (2017) Evaluation of a pilot service to facilitate discharge of patients with stable long-term mental health needs from secondary to primary care: the role of Primary Care Mental Health Specialists. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 18 (4). pp. 344-353. ISSN 1463-4236. E-ISSN 1477-1128. (doi:10.1017/S1463423617000184)

PDF - Author's Accepted Manuscript
Download (259kB) Preview
[img]
Preview
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1463423617000184

Abstract

We aimed to evaluate a pilot service to facilitate discharge of patients with stable long-term mental health needs from secondary to primary care. Patients with stable long-term mental health conditions are often not discharged from secondary mental health services when no longer needed due to insufficient systems and processes to enable safe, effective, recovery-focussed treatment and support. The Primary Care Mental Health Specialist (PCMHS) Service was developed to address this gap; new PCMHS posts were introduced to act as a conduit for patients being discharged from secondary care and a single point of referral back into secondary care, should it be required. The two-year pilot, across six Clinical Commissioning Groups in South East England, began in March 2013. Interviews were conducted with all PCMHS employed in the pilot service (n=13) and a sample of service users (n=12). The views of professionals working alongside the service, including GPs, Psychiatrists and Mental Health Nurses, were captured using a brief online questionnaire (n=50). Time and Activity Recording Sheets were used to capture data required for economic analysis. Our findings indicate that the service is working well from the perspective of patients; staff employed within the service and professionals working alongside the service. Patients described the service as a ‘safety net’ they could fall back on in case of difficulties, whereas staff used the analogy of a ‘bridge’ to describe the way the service improved communication and collaboration between the various professionals and organisations involved in the patient’s care. Improvements in well-being were seen to result from increased support for those transitioning from secondary to primary care, a more pro-active approach to relapse prevention and increased engagement in daily activities. Each PCMHS covered 36 patients in a one-month period, with a unit cost of £73.01 per patient.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1017/S1463423617000184
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
R Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Kate Hamilton-West
Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2016 17:50 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 18:11 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/58615 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Hamilton-West, Kate E.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3160-0311
Hedayioglu, Julie.A.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9805-7421
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year