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The rise of body studies and the embodiment of society: A review of the field

Shilling, Chris (2016) The rise of body studies and the embodiment of society: A review of the field. Horizons in Humanities and Social Sciences: An International Refereed Journal, 2 (1). pp. 1-14. ISSN 2413-6301.

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Abstract

During the last few decades there has been a pronounced ‘turn to the body’ within sociology and social thought. Exploring the background to and the parameters of this development, this paper explores how this focus on embodiment has been used to develop new perspectives within social and cultural analysis, and can be assessed as an essential means of avoiding the Cartesian bias within much Western thought. Revisiting sociology’s heritage, it then identifies important resources for this project within classical writings, before analyzing why the body has become such a contested phenomenon within social analysis and society. As developments in science, medicine and technology have made the body increasingly malleable, so too have they made it subject to debates and disagreements about what is normal, desirable and even sacred about the physical identities and capacities of embodied subjects.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: the body, embodiment, sociology, structures/agency, social inequalities
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Sociology
Depositing User: Lucie Patch
Date Deposited: 03 Nov 2016 12:52 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 18:07 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/58373 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Shilling, Chris: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2930-9223
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