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A unified framework of explanations for strategic persistence in the wake of others’ failures

Amankwah-Amoah, J. (2014) A unified framework of explanations for strategic persistence in the wake of others’ failures. Journal of Strategy and Management, 7 (4). pp. 422-444. ISSN 1755-425X. (doi:10.1108/JSMA-01-2014-0009) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:57791)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSMA-01-2014-0009

Abstract

Purpose – Although strategic persistence remains a key issue in change management and strategy literature, the understanding of strategic persistence in the face of other businesses’ failure remains limited. The purpose of this paper is to examine factors that determine strategic persistence in the face of other businesses’ failures. Design/methodology/approach – Through a review and synthesis of the multiple streams of research, the paper provides a number of explanations for strategic persistence. The study complements the analysis with illustrative cases of failed companies. These led to development of an integrated framework of explanations for strategic persistence in the wake of other businesses’ failures. Findings – The analysis led to identification of individual, firm-specific and environmental factors rooted in past events (i.e. past successes, prior commitment and decisions by the top-management team), present circumstances (i.e. nature of the failure) and future outlook (i.e. paradox of success, looming threats and opportunities), which foster strategic persistence. The paper uncovered that persistence may also stem from factors such as “paradox of success” and “too much invested to quit”. Research limitations/implications – The paper suggests that organisations can learn from others’ failures without compromising their values by drawing on the expertise released by failed firms. The study also identified various mechanisms through which organisations can learn from the failure of others and factors that constrain them from doing so. Originality/value – The theorisation and conceptualisation of the literature accommodates the multiple and contrasting perspectives of the subject such as the environmental buffers and paradox of success.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1108/JSMA-01-2014-0009
Uncontrolled keywords: Learning, Business failure, Knowledge spillovers, Strategic persistence
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Divisions > Kent Business School - Division > Department of Marketing, Entrepreneurship and International Business
Depositing User: Joseph Amankwah-Amoah
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2016 15:42 UTC
Last Modified: 08 Oct 2021 15:55 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/57791 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Amankwah-Amoah, J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0383-5831
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