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The evolution of science, technology and innovation policies: A review of the Ghanaian experience

Amankwah-Amoah, J. (2015) The evolution of science, technology and innovation policies: A review of the Ghanaian experience. Technological Forecasting and Social Change, 110 . pp. 134-142. ISSN 0040-1625. (doi:10.1016/j.techfore.2015.11.022) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.techfore.2015.11.022

Abstract

Although there have been considerable past accomplishments in science, technology and innovation policy literature, our understanding of the evolution of government policies in these areas as a country transitions from one political regime to another, remains limited. This paper examines the issue within the context of Ghana, an emerging economy in sub-Saharan Africa, from 1957 to 2012. After a historical review of such government policies, we uncovered three key stages in the evolution of science and technology policy. These include the adoption of the "science for development" strategy and convergence of science and industrial policy from 1957 to 1966. This was then followed by the divergence of science policy and industrial policy from 1967 to the 1990s following the overthrow of Nkrumah's government. The emergence of the "new dawn" from the 2000s onwards ushered in a new policy framework for national science and technology policy geared towards economic development. The study outlines a range of public policy implications. © 2015 Elsevier Inc.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.techfore.2015.11.022
Uncontrolled keywords: Ghana, Innovation policy, National science, Public policy, Technology policy, Economic and social effects, Economics, Engineering research, Economic development, Ghana, Industrial policies, Innovation policies, National science, Science and technology policy, Technology and Innovation Policy, Technology policy, Public policy
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School
Faculties > Social Sciences > Kent Business School > International Business and Strategy
Depositing User: Joseph Amankwah-Amoah
Date Deposited: 06 Oct 2016 15:24 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 17:58 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/57787 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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