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Adoption of the National Early Warning Score: a survey of hospital trusts in England, Northern Ireland and Wales, Canadian Association for Health Services and Policy Research

Nwulu, Ugochi, Coleman, Jamie J (2016) Adoption of the National Early Warning Score: a survey of hospital trusts in England, Northern Ireland and Wales, Canadian Association for Health Services and Policy Research. In: A Healthcare System: Let the Patient Revolution Begin! . , Toronto, Ontario (Unpublished) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided) (KAR id:56966)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
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https://www.cahspr.ca/en/presentation/574ef5de37de...

Abstract

Objectives: The primary objective was to elicit the uptake of a standardised vital signs early warning score - National Early Warning Score (NEWS) in hospitals in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In 2012, a Royal College of Physicians’ taskforce developed

Results: 27% of hospitals have some form of electronic health record system in their non-critical care wards and 20% of hospitals use computerized methods to record vital signs. All but one hospital uses a multiple parameter early warning score. Over half (55.5%) of hospitals use NEWS and 17% had plans to adopt it. Some hospitals wished to use it as part of an electronic health record system rollout planned for later in the financial year. Half of the hospitals which had no plans to adopt NEWS (24 of 44) gave explicit reasons as to why with the number one reason being that they already used a similar score. Absence of a parameter used in other scores (urine output) was also an issue for non-adopters of NEWS.

Conclusions: The results suggest that there is a steadily increasing level of acceptance of NEWS. The increased use of electronic health records appears to have helped some hospitals to adopt NEWS. A small number of hospitals disclosed that they had adapted NEWS which is a threat to the standardisation intended.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Ugochi Nwulu
Date Deposited: 15 Sep 2016 14:07 UTC
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2019 10:33 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/56966 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Nwulu, Ugochi: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6372-176X
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