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How “phubbing” becomes the norm: The antecedents and consequences of snubbing via smartphone

Chotpitayasunondh, Varoth, Douglas, Karen (2016) How “phubbing” becomes the norm: The antecedents and consequences of snubbing via smartphone. Computers in Human Behavior, 63 . pp. 9-18. ISSN 0747-5632. (doi:10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.018)

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Abstract

Smartphones allow people to connect with others from almost anywhere at any time. However, there is growing concern that smartphones may actually sometimes detract, rather than complement, social interactions. The term “phubbing” represents the act of snubbing someone in a social setting by concentrating on one’s phone instead of talking to the person directly. The current study was designed to examine some of the psychological antecedents and consequences of phubbing behavior. We examined the contributing roles of Internet addiction, fear of missing out, self-control, and smartphone addiction, and how the frequency of phubbing behavior and of being phubbed may both lead to the perception that phubbing is normative. The results revealed that Internet addiction, fear of missing out, and self-control predicted smartphone addiction, which in turn predicted the extent to which people phub. This path also predicted the extent to which people feel that phubbing is normative, both via (a) the extent to which people are phubbed themselves, and (b) independently. Further, gender moderated the relationship between the extent to which people are phubbed and their perception that phubbing is normative. The present findings suggest that phubbing is an important factor in modern communication that warrants further investigation.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.chb.2016.05.018
Uncontrolled keywords: Phubbing; smartphones; internet addiction; smartphone addiction
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Karen Douglas
Date Deposited: 05 Aug 2016 10:58 UTC
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2019 13:29 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/56749 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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