Sir2 regulates stability of repetitive domains differentially in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

Freire-Beneitez, Veronica and Gourlay, Sarah and Berman, Judith and Buscaino, Alessia (2016) Sir2 regulates stability of repetitive domains differentially in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Nucleic Acids Research, . ISSN 0305-1048. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkw594) (Full text available)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkw594

Abstract

DNA repeats, found at the ribosomal DNA locus, telomeres and subtelomeric regions, are unstable sites of eukaryotic genomes. A fine balance between genetic variability and genomic stability tunes plasticity of these chromosomal regions. This tuning mechanism is particularly important for organisms such as microbial pathogens that utilise genome plasticity as a strategy for adaptation. For the first time, we analyse mechanisms promoting genome stability at the rDNA locus and subtelomeric regions in the most common human fungal pathogen: Candida albicans In this organism, the histone deacetylase Sir2, the master regulator of heterochromatin, has acquired novel functions in regulating genome stability. Contrary to any other systems analysed, C. albicans Sir2 is largely dispensable for repressing recombination at the rDNA locus. We demonstrate that recombination at subtelomeric regions is controlled by a novel DNA element, the TLO Recombination Element, TRE, and by Sir2. While the TRE element promotes high levels of recombination, Sir2 represses this recombination rate. Finally, we demonstrate that, in C. albicans, mechanisms regulating genome stability are plastic as different environmental stress conditions lead to general genome instability and mask the Sir2-mediated recombination control at subtelomeres. Our data highlight how mechanisms regulating genome stability are rewired in C. albicans

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > QR Microbiology
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Biosciences
Depositing User: Alessia Buscaino
Date Deposited: 12 Jul 2016 10:06 UTC
Last Modified: 08 Sep 2016 08:54 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/56257 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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