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Performing the Negative: Kafka and the Origins of Late Modernism

Weller, Shane (2016) Performing the Negative: Kafka and the Origins of Late Modernism. Modern Language Review, 111 (3). pp. 775-794. ISSN 0026 7937. (doi:10.5699/modelangrevi.111.3.0775) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.5699/modelangrevi.111.3.0775

Abstract

Franz Kafka's response to late nineteenth-century language scepticism sets his work apart from the high modernism of the 1920s. Rather than seeking to achieve linguistic renewal in the manner of Joyce, Proust, or Pound, Kafka increasingly commits himself to forms of linguistic negativism that anticipate post-Second World War late modernist attempts to produce what Samuel Beckett describes as a ‘Literatur des Unworts’. This article charts the development of Kafka's linguistic negativism between 1904 and 1924, and seeks to identify the principal ways in which his ‘unwording’ was crucial for the emergence of European late modernism from Beckett to Sebald.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.5699/modelangrevi.111.3.0775
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General)
P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General) > PN865 Comparative Literature
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages > Comparative Literature
Depositing User: Shane Weller
Date Deposited: 05 Jul 2016 08:10 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 17:33 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/56212 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Weller, Shane: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9468-4930
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