Genre and Form in American Working Class Life Writing From Haymarket to the New Deal

Collins, Michael James (2017) Genre and Form in American Working Class Life Writing From Haymarket to the New Deal. In: Coles, Nicholas J. and Lauter, Paul, eds. A History of American Working Class Literature. Cambridge University Press, London. ISBN 978-1-107-10338-2. E-ISBN 978-1-108-51498-9. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316216439) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

The chapter is a discussion of two competing traditions in American Working-Class life writing, what I call the "ethnographic" tradition (which sees working-class life in terms of the Boasian concept of "culture") and a "performative" tradition (defined as a writing back against the classificatory practices of instutionalised social science. It also comprises a close-reading of the work of Hamilton Holt (the "lifelets"), Emma Goldman, The WPA, Mike Gold, and August Spies.

Item Type: Book section
Subjects: E History America > E151 United States (General)
H Social Sciences > HX Socialism. Communism. Anarchism
P Language and Literature > PS American literature
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of English
Depositing User: Michael Collins
Date Deposited: 21 Jun 2016 10:35 UTC
Last Modified: 11 Aug 2017 15:50 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/56002 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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