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Parenting self­-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour before and after a parenting programme

Bloomfield, Linda, Kendall, Sally (2012) Parenting self­-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour before and after a parenting programme. Primary Health Care Research and Development, 13 (4). pp. 364-372. ISSN 1463-4236. (doi:10.1017/S1463423612000060) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1463423612000060

Abstract

To explore whether changes in parenting self-efficacy after attending a parenting programme are related to changes in parenting stress and child behaviour. Adverse parenting is a risk factor in the development of a range of health and behavioural problems in childhood and is predictive of poor adult outcomes. Strategies for supporting parents are recognised as an effective way to improve the health, well-being and development of children. Parenting is influenced by many factors including the behaviour and characteristics of the child, the health and psychological well-being of the parent and the contextual influences of stress and support. Parenting difficulties are a major source of stress for parents, and parenting self-efficacy has been shown to be an important buffer against parenting stress. In all, 63 parents who had a child under the age of 10 years took part in the research. Of those, 58 returned completed measures of parenting self-efficacy, parenting stress and child behaviour at the start of a parenting programme and 37 at three-month follow-up. Improvements in parenting self-efficacy and parenting stress were found at follow-up, but there was less evidence for improvements in child behaviour. The findings clearly suggest a relationship between parenting self-efficacy and parenting stress; parents who are feeling less efficacious experience higher levels of stress, whereas greater parenting self-efficacy is related to less stress. This study adds to the evidence that parent outcomes may be a more reliable measure of programme effectiveness than child outcomes at least in the short term.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1017/S1463423612000060
Uncontrolled keywords: child behaviour; parenting programmes; parenting self-efficacy; parenting stress; TOPSE
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman > HQ755 Popular works. Guidebook for parents > HQ755.8 Parents. Parenthood
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 04 May 2016 15:34 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 17:17 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/55251 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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