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TOPSE: the development of an instrument to measure parenting self­?efficacy as an aid to evaluating the effectiveness of parenting programmes.

Bloomfield, L., Kendall, Sally (2006) TOPSE: the development of an instrument to measure parenting self­?efficacy as an aid to evaluating the effectiveness of parenting programmes. In: Pyschology and Health. 19 (s1). p. 17. Taylor & Francis Ltd (doi:10.1080/08870440412331291490) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08870440412331291490

Abstract

Objectives?The aim of this study is to develop robust outcome measures, which draw on well-developed theoretical constructs, that measure parent's perceived ability to manage their children and which are applicable in the UK context. An instrument to measure parenting self-efficacy will enable a rigorous evaluation of the effectiveness of different types of parenting programmes as well as pre- and post-course measures of individual programmes and will facilitate an evaluation of the longer-term effects on the well-being of parents and their children. Methods?Focus groups were conducted with a diverse range of parents and with parenting programme facilitators to discover what are the major challenges and difficulties surrounding parenting at different stages of being a parent from infancy through to school entry. We used the evidence base provided by the focus group discussions and from the literature on parenting and self-efficacy to inform the instrument. Self-efficacy statements were developed in Likert-format and a multi-method approach was used to test and refine the instrument. Instrument validity and cultural sensitivity were checked by a panel of experts from the fields of self-efficacy and parenting, and by parents. Internal and external reliability were analysed using SPSS. Results?In total 70 participants took part in twelve focus groups and a diverse range of consistent themes emerged surrounding behaviour management, self-control, self-acceptance, empathy and affection. Nine domain specific subscales of parenting self-efficacy were identified from the analysis of the focus group transcripts. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the subscales ranged from 0.80 to 0.89, the full-scale alpha (82 items) was equal to 0.94. Spearman's correlation coefficients for a control group of parents ranged from rs?=?0.58, n?=?19, p<0.01 to rs?=?0.88, n?=?19, p<0.01. There was a significant difference in scores between parents identified as having parenting difficulties and the control group on all but one subscale. Conclusion?An instrument to measure parenting self-efficacy in the UK has been developed from the evidence provided by parents and parenting programme facilitators. The instrument has been developed from a sound theoretical framework and is currently being piloted to measure the effectiveness of parenting programmes in the UK.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Other)
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/08870440412331291490
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman > HQ755 Popular works. Guidebook for parents > HQ755.8 Parents. Parenthood
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Tony Rees
Date Deposited: 29 Apr 2016 12:57 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 17:17 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/55192 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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