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Global Climate Change and Leadership: The Role of Major Players in Finding Solutions to Common Problems

Weiler, Florian (2010) Global Climate Change and Leadership: The Role of Major Players in Finding Solutions to Common Problems. Bologna Center Journal of International Affairs, . pp. 13-26. ISSN 1592-3436. E-ISSN 1592-3444. (KAR id:54934)

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Abstract

In the international negotiations aiming to solve the global warming problem, the world is still far from reaching a meaningful agreement able to substantially curb emissions. One reason for this failure is a free-rider problem inherent to all public goods. Additionally, the way climate change negotiations are conducted are an artifact of the past and not suitable for an increasingly multipolar world. Given these structural problems, unsurprisingly neither the US nor China are willing to play the role required of them to foster negotiation success. Europe however, is to some degree willing to lead but lacks leverage. To improve the chances of solving the global warming problem, our leaders should therefore consider changing the negotiation rules.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: J Political Science > JA Political science (General)
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations
Depositing User: Florian Weiler
Date Deposited: 13 Apr 2016 10:17 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:34 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54934 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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