The Paradox of Conflict Tourism: The Commodification of War or Conflict Transformation in Practice?

Cochrane, Feargal (2015) The Paradox of Conflict Tourism: The Commodification of War or Conflict Transformation in Practice? The Brown Journal of World Affairs, XXII (1). pp. 51-69. ISSN 1080-0786. (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

PDF (Final typeset copy) - Pre-print
Restricted to Repository staff only

Creative Commons Licence
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Contact us about this Publication Download (386kB)
[img]

Abstract

Tourism in the aftermath of war is an inherently political endeavor, presenting both challenges and opportunities for societies emerging from violent conflict. This relates in part to the fact that tourism inevitably collides with the legacy of conflict and frames its narrative, while at the same time providing new resources that, while likely to be contested, are also much needed. In fact, over time, the conflict itself can become absorbed into a consumable tourist commodity that sanitizes the conflict into a form of heritage. This can lead to perceptions that the visceral, painful, and traumatic experience of violent conflict is being cheapened and airbrushed into an anodyne form that misrepresents the actual lived experience of conflict. This article examines these potent themes associated with what is often termed dark tourism and connects them to theoretical debates in conflict studies surrounding post-conflict peacebuilding and transformation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Tourism, International Relations and Conflict Transformation
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > G Geography (General)
J Political Science > JZ International relations
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations > Conflict Analysis Research Centre
Depositing User: Feargal Cochrane
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2016 14:57 UTC
Last Modified: 08 May 2018 09:02 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54793 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year