Congruence of tail use behaviors between male and female mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata)

Wheeler, Brandon C and Ungar, Peter (2001) Congruence of tail use behaviors between male and female mantled howling monkeys (Alouatta palliata). Folia Primatologica, 72 (5). pp. 292-297. ISSN 0015-5713. E-ISSN 1421-9980. (doi:1159/000049950) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/1159/000049950

Abstract

Differences between males and females in locomotor and positional behaviors have been documented for several primate species [1, 2]. In Alouatta palliata for example, females climb and use smaller substrates more than males [3–5]. Such sex differences are usually related to body size. Indeed, interspecific studies have repeatedly demonstrated relationships between body size and locomotor and positional behaviors. It is easier, for example, for a large primate to suspend beneath a branch than to balance on top of it [6, 7]. This is particularly true for primates that feed near the periphery of the crown, where branches tend to be smaller.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > Biological Anthropology
Depositing User: Brandon Wheeler
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2016 13:54 UTC
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2017 12:55 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54731 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Wheeler, Brandon C: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-8478-3385
  • Depositors only (login required):