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Qua Re qui possum non esse popularis: The representation of Populares in the Late Roman Republic.

Nash, Michael A. (2015) Qua Re qui possum non esse popularis: The representation of Populares in the Late Roman Republic. Master of Arts by Research (MARes) thesis, University of Kent, N/A.

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Abstract

The terms popularis and optimate have been employed in both ancient and modern literature to interpret late Roman Republican politics. The purpose of this work is to express the diversity and change of the popularis label from 133 to 88 B.C. as a consequence of developing political practices. A chronological assessment of five key popularis tribunes in this period; Ti. Sempronius Gracchus, G. Sempronius Gracchus, L. Appuleius Saturninus, M. Livius Drusus and P. Sulpicius Rufus determines the variation in political methodologies exploited by these men in response to an optimate opposition. An assessment of Cicero’s works then considers how the discrepancies exhibited by these politicians could be manipulated for oratorical advantage. This subsequently reveals the perception of pre-Sullan populares in the time of Cicero, a generation later. This work ultimately aims to demonstrate the individualistic nature of late Republican politicians, the evolution of political practice in the period and the diverse employment of political labels in contemporary sources.

Item Type: Thesis (Master of Arts by Research (MARes))
Thesis advisor: Laurence, Ray
Thesis advisor: Keaveney, Arthur P.
Uncontrolled keywords: Popularis, Populares, Optimate, Optimates, Roman History, Politics, Late Roman Republic
Subjects: C Auxiliary Sciences of History > CB History of civilization
D History General and Old World > DE The Mediterranean Region. The Greco-Roman World
J Political Science
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages > Classical and Archaeological Studies
Depositing User: Users 1 not found.
Date Deposited: 29 Feb 2016 11:38 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 17:02 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54327 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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