Skip to main content

Assessing the global zoo response to the amphibian crisis through 20-year trends in captive collections

Dawson, Jeff, Patel, Freisha, Griffiths, Richard A., Young, Richard P. (2015) Assessing the global zoo response to the amphibian crisis through 20-year trends in captive collections. Conservation Biology, 30 (1). pp. 82-91. ISSN 0888-8892. E-ISSN 1523-1739. (doi:10.1111/cobi.12563) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cobi.12563

Abstract

Global amphibian declines are one of the biggest challenges currently facing the conservation community, and captive breeding is one way to address this crisis. Using information from the International Species Information System zoo network, we examined trends in global zoo amphibian holdings across species, zoo region, and species geographical region of origin from 1994 to 2014. These trends were compared before and after the 2004 Global Amphibian Assessment to assess whether any changes occurred and whether zoo amphibian conservation effort had increased. The numbers of globally threatened species (GTS) and their proportional representation in global zoo holdings increased and this rate of increase was significantly greater after 2004. North American, European, and Oceanian GTS were best represented in zoos globally, and proportions of Oceanian GTS held increased the most since 2004. South American and Asian GTS had the lowest proportional representation in zoos. At a regional zoo level, European zoos held the lowest proportions of GTS, and this proportion did not increase after 2004. Since 1994, the number of species held in viable populations has increased, and these species are distributed among more institutions. However, as of 2014, zoos held 6.2% of globally threatened amphibians, a much smaller figure than for other vertebrate groups and one that falls considerably short of the number of species for which ex situ management may be desirable. Although the increased effort zoos have put into amphibian conservation over the past 20 years is encouraging, more focus is needed on ex situ conservation priority species. This includes building expertise and capacity in countries that hold them and tracking existing conservation efforts if the evidence-based approach to amphibian conservation planning at a global level is to be further developed.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1111/cobi.12563
Uncontrolled keywords: captive breeding; ex situ conservation; IUCN Red List; threatened species
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH75 Conservation (Biology)
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Anthropology and Conservation > DICE (Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology)
Depositing User: Richard Griffiths
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2016 11:33 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 17:01 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54240 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):