A durable gain in motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease following repeated caloric vestibular stimulation: A single-case study

Wilkinson, David T. and Podlewska, Aleksandra and Sakel, Mohamed (2016) A durable gain in motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease following repeated caloric vestibular stimulation: A single-case study. NeuroRehabilitation, . pp. 1-4. ISSN 1053-8135. E-ISSN 1878-6448. (doi:https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-161308) (Full text available)

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Abstract

Objective: To gain ‘first-in-man’ evidence that repeated caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), a non-invasive form of neuro-modulation, can induce a lasting and clinically-relevant reduction in Parkinson’s Disease (PD) symptoms. Methods: A 70yr old male, diagnosed with PD 7 years prior to study enrolment, self-administered CVS at home 2x20 minutes per day for three months using a solid-state portable device. Standardised neuropsychological assessments of motor, cognitive, affective and independent function were carried out prior to stimulation, at the start and end of the sham (month 1) and active (months 2-3) phases, and 5 months post-stimulation. Results: Relative to the pre-stimulation baseline, behavioural improvements that exceeded the minimal detectable change were observed on the EQ5D, Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale, Schwab and England scale, 2 minute walk, Timed up and go, Non-motor symptom assessment scale for PD, Montreal cognitive assessment, Hospital depression scale and Epworth sleepiness scale. The level of change exceeded the threshold for a minimal clinically important difference on all scales for which a threshold has been published. By contrast, little improvement was seen during the sham (i.e. placebo) phase. Conclusion: Caloric vestibular stimulation may offer a novel, home-based method of relieving everyday symptoms of PD, and merits further evaluative study.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: balance, neuro-stimulation, neuro-degeneration
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: David Wilkinson
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2016 17:06 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Dec 2016 14:05 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54142 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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