Chicken Husbandry in Late-Medieval Eastern England: c. 1250-1400

Slavin, Philip (2009) Chicken Husbandry in Late-Medieval Eastern England: c. 1250-1400. Anthropozoologica, 44 (2). pp. 35-56. ISSN 0761-3032. E-ISSN 2107-0881. (doi:https://doi.org/10.5252/az2009n2a2) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5252/az2009n2a2

Abstract

The present article studies the place of the chicken within the changing environment of late-medieval England. First, it looks at the seigniorial sector of chicken farming, in terms of size of stocks, patterns of disposal and scale of consumption. It then explores the patchy data regarding the peasant sector. The study shows that overall patterns differed between the pre- and post-Black Death periods. After the pestilence, chicken husbandry started shifting from the demesne to the peasant sector of agriculture. The post-1350 changes reflect larger processes, which occurred in late-medieval society, economy and environment.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Poultry, chickens, capons, eggs, demesne, peasants, the Black Death, food.
Subjects: D History General and Old World
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: M.R.L. Hurst
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2016 15:12 UTC
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2016 10:29 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54135 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Slavin, Philip: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6460-145X
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