Warfare and Ecological Destruction in Early Fourteenth-century British Isles

Slavin, Philip (2014) Warfare and Ecological Destruction in Early Fourteenth-century British Isles. Environmental History, 19 (3). pp. 528-550. ISSN 1084-5453. E-ISSN 1930-8892. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/envhis/emu033) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/envhis/emu033

Abstract

The environmental, economic, and demographic consequences of Anglo-Scottish warfare in the early fourteenth century were far reaching. This article looks at the extent of environmental damage brought about by the ongoing warfare, primarily between England and Scotland from 1296 to 1328. The conflict coincided with a series of ecological and biological crises, most notably the Great European Famine of 1315–17 and the Great Bovine Pestilence of 1319–20. As I argue, the armed conflict aggravated the crisis further and caused immense damage within the war zones of the British Isles.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: D History General and Old World
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of History
Depositing User: M.R.L. Hurst
Date Deposited: 10 Feb 2016 14:54 UTC
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2016 12:48 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/54124 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Slavin, Philip: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6460-145X
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