"Imagined guilt” versus “recollected guilt”: Implications for fMRI

McLatchie, Neil and Derbyshire, Stuart W. G. and Giner-Sorolla, Roger (2016) "Imagined guilt” versus “recollected guilt”: Implications for fMRI. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, . ISSN 1749-5016. E-ISSN 1749-5024. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsw001) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsw001

Abstract

Guilt is thought to maintain social harmony by motivating reparation (Haidt, 2003; Trivers, 1971). The present study compared two methodologies commonly used to identify the neural correlates of guilt. The first, imagined guilt, requires participants to read hypothetical scenarios and then imagine themselves as the protagonist. The second, recollected guilt, requires participants to reflect on times they personally experienced guilt. In the fMRI scanner, participants were presented with guilt/neutral memories and guilt/neutral hypothetical scenarios. Contrasts confirmed a priori predictions that guilt memories, relative to guilt scenarios, were associated with significantly greater activity in regions associated with affect (ACC, Basal GangliaCaudate, Insular, OFC) and social cognition (TP, precuneus). Similarly, results indicated that guilt memories, relative to neutral memories, were also associated with greater activity in affective (ACC, amygdala, Insular, OFC) and social cognition (mPFC, TP, precuneus, TPJ) regions. There were no significant differences between guilt hypothetical scenarios and neutral hypothetical scenarios in either affective or social cognition regions. The importance of distinguishing between different guilt inductions inside the scanner are discussed. We offer explanations of our results and discuss ideas for future research.

Item Type: Article
Projects: [UNSPECIFIED] Guilt and self-control in individual and social dilemmas
Uncontrolled keywords: guilt, neuroimaging, fMRI, methodology, anticipation, recall
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Roger Giner-Sorolla
Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2016 17:00 UTC
Last Modified: 25 Feb 2016 14:32 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53642 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):