Skip to main content

Characteristics that predict firesetting in male and female mentally disordered offenders

Tyler, Nichola, Gannon, Theresa A., Dickens, Geoffrey L., Lockerbie, Lona (2015) Characteristics that predict firesetting in male and female mentally disordered offenders. Psychology, Crime & Law, 21 (8). pp. 776-797. ISSN 1068-316X. E-ISSN 1477-2744. (doi:10.1080/1068316X.2015.1054382) (KAR id:53578)

XML Word Processing Document (DOCX) Author's Accepted Manuscript
Language: English
Download (89kB)
[thumbnail of Tyler_etal_2015_predictingfiresetting_RG.docx]
This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.
Request an accessible format
Official URL
http://doi.org/10.1080/1068316X.2015.1054382

Abstract

Few studies have adequately explored the characteristics of male and female mentally disordered firesetters and compared these to those of non-firesetting mentally disordered offenders. Furthermore, there is a paucity of research examining the characteristics which can predict repeat firesetting within this population. The current study aimed to examine similarities and differences in the characteristics of (1) male and female mentally disordered firesetters, (2) male and female mentally disordered firesetters compared to non-firesetting offenders, and (3) one-time and repeat firesetters. Furthermore, the ability of these characteristics to predict offence status (i.e. firesetter or non-firesetter) and repeat firesetting was explored. Information was collected from patient hospital records for 77 (43 firesetters, 34 non-firesetters) mentally disordered offenders; including sociodemographic, family and personal background, psychiatric, and offence history factors. The findings suggest that mentally disordered firesetters are similar to their non-firesetting counterparts on key characteristics; however, firesetters are more likely to have an expressed interest in fire/explosives and a diagnosis of a schizophrenic disorder and female firesetters are more likely to have a higher number of firesetting incidents than males. Furthermore, findings suggest that fire interest is the largest predictor of repeat firesetting. Clinical implications in terms of treatment and risk assessment are discussed.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1080/1068316X.2015.1054382
Uncontrolled keywords: Arson, firesetting, gender differences in offending, mentally disordered offender, forensic mental health
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Theresa Gannon
Date Deposited: 04 Jan 2016 13:53 UTC
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2021 11:07 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53578 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Gannon, Theresa A.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-5810-4158
  • Depositors only (login required):