Skip to main content

Culture shapes empathic responses to physical and social pain

Atkins, David, Uskul, Ayse K., Cooper, N. (2016) Culture shapes empathic responses to physical and social pain. Emotion, 16 (5). pp. 587-601. ISSN 1528-3542. E-ISSN 1931-1516. (doi:10.1037/emo0000162) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

PDF - Author's Accepted Manuscript
Restricted to Repository staff only
Contact us about this Publication Download (348kB)
[img]
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/emo0000162

Abstract

The present research investigates the extent to which cultural background moderates empathy in response to observing someone undergoing physical or social pain. In three studies, we demonstrate that, East Asian and White British participants differ in both affective and cognitive components of their empathic reactions in response to someone else’s pain. Compared with East Asian participants, British participants report greater empathic concern and show lower empathic accuracy. Importantly, findings cannot be explained by an in-group advantage effect. Potential reasons for observed cultural differences are discussed.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1037/emo0000162
Uncontrolled keywords: empathy, culture, empathic accuracy, negative affect, empathic concern
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Ayse K. Uskul
Date Deposited: 29 Dec 2015 00:02 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:50 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53564 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year