Skip to main content

The hippocampus and entorhinal cortex encode the path and Euclidean distances to goals during navigation

Howard, Lorelei R, Javadi, Amir-Homayoun, Yu, Yichao, Mill, Ravi D, Morrison, Laura C, Knight, Rebecca, Loftus, Michelle M, Staskute, Laura, Spiers, Hugo J (2014) The hippocampus and entorhinal cortex encode the path and Euclidean distances to goals during navigation. Current biology : CB, 24 (12). pp. 1331-1340. ISSN 0960-9822. E-ISSN 1879-0445. (doi:10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.001) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.001

Abstract

BACKGROUND Despite decades of research on spatial memory, we know surprisingly little about how the brain guides navigation to goals. While some models argue that vectors are represented for navigational guidance, other models postulate that the future path is computed. Although the hippocampal formation has been implicated in processing spatial goal information, it remains unclear whether this region processes path- or vector-related information. RESULTS We report neuroimaging data collected from subjects navigating London's Soho district; these data reveal that both the path distance and the Euclidean distance to the goal are encoded by the medial temporal lobe during navigation. While activity in the posterior hippocampus was sensitive to the distance along the path, activity in the entorhinal cortex was correlated with the Euclidean distance component of a vector to the goal. During travel periods, posterior hippocampal activity increased as the path to the goal became longer, but at decision points, activity in this region increased as the path to the goal became closer and more direct. Importantly, sensitivity to the distance was abolished in these brain areas when travel was guided by external cues. CONCLUSIONS The results indicate that the hippocampal formation contains representations of both the Euclidean distance and the path distance to goals during navigation. These findings argue that the hippocampal formation houses a flexible guidance system that changes how it represents distance to the goal depending on the fluctuating demands of navigation.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.05.001
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Amir-Homayoun Javadi
Date Deposited: 13 Dec 2015 18:13 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:45 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53271 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Javadi, Amir-Homayoun: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0569-6441
  • Depositors only (login required):