The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex on exercise-induced pain.

Angius, Luca and Hopker, James G. and Marcora, Samuele Maria and Mauger, Alexis R. (2015) The effect of transcranial direct current stimulation of the motor cortex on exercise-induced pain. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 115 (11). pp. 2311-2319. ISSN 1439-6319. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-015-3212-y) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-015-3212-y

Abstract

Purpose Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) provides a new exciting means to investigate the role of the brain during exercise. However, this technique is not widely used in exercise science, with little known regarding effective electrode montages. This study investigated whether tDCS of the motor cortex (M1) would elicit an analgesic response to exercise-induced pain (EIP). Methods Nine participants completed a VO2max test and three time to exhaustion (TTE) tasks on separate days following either 10 min 2 mA tDCS of the M1, a sham or a control. Additionally, seven participants completed 3 cold pressor tests (CPT) following the same experimental conditions (tDCS, SHAM, CON). Using a well-established tDCS protocol, tDCS was delivered by placing the anodal electrode above the left M1 with the cathodal electrode above dorsolateral right prefrontal cortex. Gas exchange, blood lactate, EIP and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were monitored during the TTE test. Perceived pain was recorded during the CPT. Results During the TTE, no significant differences in time to exhaustion, RPE or EIP were found between conditions. However, during the CPT, perceived pain was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in the tDCS condition (7.4 ± 1.2) compared with both the CON (8.6 ± 1.0) and SHAM (8.4 ± 1.3) conditions. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that stimulation of the M1 using tDCS does not induce analgesia during exercise, suggesting that the processing of pain produced via classic measures of experimental pain (i.e., a CPT) is different to that of EIP. These results provide important methodological advancement in developing the use of tDCS in exercise.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Fatigue Pain perception Performance tDCS Exercise
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > Sports sciences
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1235 Physiology of sports
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: James Hopker
Date Deposited: 11 Dec 2015 14:33 UTC
Last Modified: 23 Mar 2017 09:37 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53182 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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