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Responding to social and symbolic extrafoveal cues: Cue shape trumps biological relevance

Hermens, Frouke, Bindemann, Markus, Burton, A. Mike (2017) Responding to social and symbolic extrafoveal cues: Cue shape trumps biological relevance. Psychological Research, 81 (1). pp. 24-42. ISSN 0340-0727. E-ISSN 1430-2772. (doi:10.1007/s00426-015-0733-2) (KAR id:53148)

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Abstract

Social cues presented at visual fixation have been shown to strongly influence an observer’s attention and response selection. Here we ask whether the same holds for cues (initially) presented away from fixation, more alike how cues are commonly perceived in natural vision. In six experiments, we show that extrafoveally presented cues with a distinct outline, such as pointing hands, rotated heads, and arrow cues result in strong cueing of responses (either to the cue itself, or a cued object). In contrast, cues without a clear outline, such as gazing eyes and direction words have a much weaker effects on participants’ responses to a target cue. We also show that distraction effects on response times are relatively weak, but that strong interference effects can be obtained by measuring mouse trajectories. Eye tracking suggests that gaze cues are slower to respond to because their direction cannot easily be perceived in extrafoveal vision. Together these data suggest that the strength of an extrafoveal cue is determined by the shape of the outline of the cue, rather than its biological relevance (i.e., whether the cue is provided by another human being), and that this shape effect is due to how easily the direction of the cue can be perceived in extrafoveal vision.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/s00426-015-0733-2
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Divisions > Division of Human and Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Markus Bindemann
Date Deposited: 11 Dec 2015 10:56 UTC
Last Modified: 16 Feb 2021 13:31 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53148 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Bindemann, Markus: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9608-4186
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