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Effects of an 18-week strength and balance exercise intervention: physiological, biomechanical and psychological changes in older adult fallers.

Higgs, Fiona, Winter, Samantha L., Chadderton, H, Thatcher, J (2012) Effects of an 18-week strength and balance exercise intervention: physiological, biomechanical and psychological changes in older adult fallers. In: 13th International Falls & Postural Stability Conference, September 10, 2012, Leeds, UK.

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Abstract

Introduction The aims were to investigate the effects of an 18-week PSI intervention on muscle mass, balance, exercise motivation (EM), well-being (WB) and falls incidence. Methodology A sample of twenty-two patient volunteers (age 77.14 ± 7.2 years) were referred onto the PSI intervention from a local falls clinic service. Clinic-based tests (e.g. Timed-Up and Go (TUGT), Romberg Balance (ROM), Falls Efficacy Scale-International) were administered by the PSI instructor before first PSI class attendance (T0) and after 6 PSI classes (T1). At T0, T1 and after attending a further twelve community-based weekly PSI classes (T2), laboratory-based assessments of balance were conducted using force plate data; and well-being and exercise motivation by questionnaires. Whole body composition was measured using a DXA scanner at T0 and T2. Monthly falls incidence was recorded via telephone interview for six months following T2. Results There were no significant changes (P >0.05) in EM, WB, or in lean, fat or bone mass, (T0-T2). Significant reductions (P<0.05) were found between T0-T2 in the laboratory-based balance assessments for medio-lateral (ML; T0 9.58 ± 4.32; T2 8.69 ± 5.05) and antero-posterior (AP; T0 3.59 ± 4.93; T2 2.80 ± 1.83) sway and elliptical area (T0 479.50 ± 1064.17; T2 263.90 ± 331.50). Significant improvements were found in performance of all clinic-based tests – except for TUGT (T0-1), but were not replicated in the laboratory-based tests (T0-1). In the first month after the PSI intervention 13.4% of participants fell one or more times, this increased to 46.2% 6 months after the intervention Conclusion Clinic-based tests showed significant improvements in performance (T0-1); that were not replicated in objective laboratory-based tests. Taken together the results suggest that changes in neural control were the cause of improved functional test scores. Short PSI interventions do not replicate the long-term reduction in falls seen after 48 week PSI programmes.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Poster)
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology (Living systems)
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Sport and Exercise Sciences
Depositing User: Samantha Winter
Date Deposited: 11 Dec 2015 00:15 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:43 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/53128 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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