Skip to main content

What is the real impact of acute kidney injury?

Bedford, Michael, Stevens, Paul E., Wheeler, Toby W.K., Farmer, Christopher K. (2014) What is the real impact of acute kidney injury? BMC Nephrology, 15 (95). ISSN 1471-2369. (doi:10.1186/1471-2369-15-95)

Abstract

Background

A retrospective observational database study from secondary care in East Kent (adult catchment population of 582,300). All adult patients (18 years or over) admitted between 1st February 2009 and 31st July 2009, were included. Patients receiving chronic renal replacement therapy (RRT), maternity and day case admissions were excluded. AKI was defined by the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria. A time dependent risk analysis with logistic regression and Cox regression was used for the analysis of in-hospital mortality and survival.

Results

This data comes closer to the real incidence and outcomes of AKI managed in-hospital than any study published in the literature to date. Fifteen percent of all admissions sustained an episode of AKI with increased subsequent short and long term morbidity and mortality, even in those with AKIN1. This confers an increased burden and cost to the healthcare economy, which can now be quantified. These results will furnish a baseline for quality improvement projects aimed at early identification, improved management, and where possible prevention, of AKI.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1186/1471-2369-15-95
Uncontrolled keywords: AKI; Incidence; Impact; Outcomes; General hospital
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Centre for Health Services Studies
Depositing User: Chris Farmer
Date Deposited: 07 Dec 2015 16:51 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Feb 2020 04:13 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/52886 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Farmer, Christopher K.: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1736-8242
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year