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How availability of food affects attentional control in restrained eaters: Eye movements in a pictorial-adapted antisaccade task.

Hotham, Sarah, Sharma, Dinkar (2015) How availability of food affects attentional control in restrained eaters: Eye movements in a pictorial-adapted antisaccade task. In: Emerging methods in addiction research programme, June 11-12th 2015, South Bank University. (Unpublished) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

Background: Previous research notes diminished attentional control in restrained eaters when presented with food images. This loss of attentional control is attributed to both approach and avoidance biases. Two eye-tracking experiments extended these findings by exploring how the availability of food affects both types of attentional control. Methods: In experiment one participants (N = 72) completed a pictorial-adapted antisaccade task (food vs. neutral). In experiment two, prior to completing the antisaccade task, participants (N = 70) chose six unhealthy snacks to consume after the experiment (i.e., actionable food). DEBQ assessed levels of eating restraint. Using saccade latency, a bias score was calculated as a proxy for attentional control (Saccade Latency Food – Saccade Latency Neutral). Findings: In the first experiment, attentional control between restrained and unrestrained eaters did not differ significantly. However in the second experiment, when participants were expecting to eat, restrained eaters demonstrated an approach bias towards food images. Discussion: Restrained eaters are typically unsuccessful at losing weight, despite a strong intention to diet. Loss of attentional control in the presence of food images may contribute to this relationship. Expecting to eat unhealthy food reinforces this vulnerability in restrained eaters and offers a potential explanation for why weight loss is not achieved.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Speech)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Dinkar Sharma
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 15:24 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:35 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/52670 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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