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Internet addiction and time perception

Gonidis, Lazaros, Sharma, Dinkar (2015) Internet addiction and time perception. In: Emerging methods in addiction research programme, June 11-12th 2015, South Bank University. (Unpublished) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)

Abstract

Research has shown that non-substance addictions can cause similar attention biases as substance addictions. The last decades, together with the boom of the internet a new non-substance addiction materialized, the Internet or Online addiction (IA). The last years more research has explored the underlying mechanisms that are involved in IA, however there is not much research on how IA affects our time perception. With the current study, using a time bisection task, we aimed to explore possible attention bias towards internet related stimuli and also look for possible practice effects from performing the task five consecutive times (five blocks). Analysis of the Weber Ratios (WR) suggests that Internet related stimuli maintain a good discriminability across blocks, contrary to neutral stimuli that lead to decreasing discriminability. Furthermore, analysis of the bisection points (BP) suggests that participants’ arousal levels drop at a much slower pace across blocks for Internet related stimuli compared to neutral matched stimuli.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Speech)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Dinkar Sharma
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 15:17 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:35 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/52669 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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