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Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation

Ditye, Thomas, Javadi, Amir-Homayoun, Carbon, Claus-christian, Walsh, Vincent (2013) Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation Sleep facilitates long-term face adaptation. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 230 (1769). p. 20131698. ISSN 1471-2954. (doi:10.1098/rspb.2013.1698) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2013.1698

Abstract

Adaptation is an automatic neural mechanism supporting the optimization of visual processing on the basis of previous experiences. While the short-term effects of adaptation on behaviour and physiology have been studied exten- sively, perceptual long-term changes associated with adaptation are still poorlyunderstood.Here,we showthat the integrationofadaptation-dependent long-term shifts in neural function is facilitated by sleep. Perceptual shifts induced by adaptation to a distorted image of a famous person were larger in a group of participants who had slept (experiment 1) or merely napped for 90 min (experiment 2) during the interval between adaptation and test com- pared with controls who stayed awake. Participants’ individual rapid eye movement sleep duration predicted the size of post-sleep behavioural adap- tation effects. Our data suggest that sleep prevented decay of adaptation in a way that is qualitatively different from the effects of reduced visual interfer- ence known as ‘storage’. In the light of the well-established link between sleep andmemory consolidation, our findings link the perceptual mechanisms of sensory adaptation—which are usually not considered to play a relevant role in mnemonic processes—with learning and memory, and at the same time reveal a new function of sleep in cognition.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1098/rspb.2013.1698
Uncontrolled keywords: adaptation,faces,figural after-effects,learning,plasticity,sleep
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Amir-Homayoun Javadi
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 10:46 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:35 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/52621 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Javadi, Amir-Homayoun: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0569-6441
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