Differential representation of feedback and decision in adolescents and adults.

Javadi, Amir-Homayoun, Schmidt, Dirk H K, Smolka, Michael N (2014) Differential representation of feedback and decision in adolescents and adults. Neuropsychologia, 56 . pp. 280-8. ISSN 0028-3932. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24513024 http:/...

Abstract

It is widely accepted that brain maturation from adolescence to adulthood contributes to substantial behavioural changes. Despite this, however, knowledge of the precise mechanisms is still sparse. We used fMRI to investigate developmental differences between healthy adolescents (age range 14-15) and adults (age range 20-39) in feedback-related decision making using a probabilistic reversal learning task. Conventionally groups are compared based on continuous values of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) percentage signal change. In contrast, we transformed these values into discrete states and used the pattern of these states to compare groups. We focused our analysis on anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), ventral striatum (VS) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) as their functions have been shown to be critical in feedback related decision making. Discretisation of continuous BOLD values revealed differential patterns of activity as compared to conventional statistical methods. Results showed differential representation of feedback and decision in ACC and vmPFC between adolescents and adults but no difference in VS. We argue that the pattern of activity of ACC, vmPFC and VS in adolescents resulted in several drawbacks in decision making such as redundant and imprecise representation of decision and subsequently poorer performance in terms of the number of system changes (change of contingencies). This method can be effectively used to infer group differences from within-group analysis rather than studying the differences by direct between-group comparisons.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Adolescent,Adult,Age Factors,Analysis of Variance,Cerebral Cortex,Cerebral Cortex: blood supply,Cerebral Cortex: physiology,Decision Making,Decision Making: physiology,Feedback,Female,Humans,Magnetic Resonance Imaging,Male,Neuropsychological Tests,Nonparametric,Psychological,Psychological: physiology,Reversal Learning,Reward,Statistics,Young Adult
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Amir-Homayoun Javadi
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 11:36 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:34 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/52613 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Javadi, Amir-Homayoun: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0569-6441
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