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Automatic approach bias towards smoking cues is present in smokers but not in ex-smokers.

Wiers, Corinde E, Javadi, Amir-Homayoun, Bermpohl, Felix (2013) Automatic approach bias towards smoking cues is present in smokers but not in ex-smokers. Psychopharmacology, 229 (1). pp. 187-97. ISSN 1432-2072. E-ISSN 1432-2072. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23604335

Abstract

RATIONALE: Drug-addicted individuals show automatic approach tendencies towards drug-related cues, i.e., an approach bias (ApB). Nevertheless, little is known about ApB in tobacco smokers and about the presence of ApB after smoking abstinence. OBJECTIVES: We investigated ApB to smoking cues in heavy tobacco smokers versus never-smokers and studied its relation to smoking characteristics and craving. Second, we compared ApBs of heavy smokers with biases of abstinent heavy smokers. METHOD: A group of current heavy smokers (n = 24), ex-smokers who were abstinent for at least 5 years (n = 20), and never-smokers (n = 20) took part in the experiment. An indirect smoking approach avoidance task was performed, in which participants were required to respond to pictures of smoking and neutral cues by pulling (approach) or pushing (avoid) on a joystick, according to the content-irrelevant format of the picture (landscape or portrait). Craving scores were examined using the Questionnaire of Smoking Urges. RESULTS: Heavy smokers showed an ApB for smoking cues compared to ex-smokers and never-smokers, which correlated positively to craving scores. There were no group differences in ApB scores for ex-smokers and never-smokers. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that ApBs for smoking cues are present in heavy smokers and decrease after long-term successful smoking cessation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Adult,Cues,Female,Humans,Male,Middle Aged,Photic Stimulation,Photic Stimulation: methods,Psychomotor Performance,Questionnaires,Reaction Time,Smoking,Smoking Cessation,Smoking Cessation: psychology,Smoking: psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Cognitive Psychology
Depositing User: Amir-Homayoun Javadi
Date Deposited: 03 Dec 2015 11:51 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:34 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/52606 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Javadi, Amir-Homayoun: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0569-6441
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