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Observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 and deep impact by the OSIRIS cameras onboard Rosetta

Küppers, M. and Keller, H.U. and Fornasier, S. and Gutiérrez, P.J. and Hviid, S.F. and Jorda, L. and Knollenberg, J. and Lowry, S.C. and Rengel, M. (2009) Observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 and deep impact by the OSIRIS cameras onboard Rosetta. In: Deep Impact as a World Observatory Event: Synergies in Space, Time, and Wavelength. Proceedings of the ESO/VUB Conference held in Brussels, Belgium, 7-10 August 2006. Eso astrophysics Symposia - European Southern Observatory, 2009 . Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 29-39. ISBN 978-3-540-76958-3. E-ISBN 978-3-540-76959-0. (doi:10.1007/978-3-540-76959-0_4) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-76959-0_4

Abstract

The OSIRIS cameras onboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft observed comet 9P/Tempel 1 near-continuously from 28 June until 14 July 2005. The Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) monitored the cometary dust, while the wide angle camera (WAC) observed through filters sensitive to emissions of OH, CN, OI, Na, and the associated continuum. The brightness of the dust increased by a factor of 4.5 within 30 minutes, measured in a circular aperture of 3000 km radius centered on the nucleus. The brightening is likely caused by ejection of material from the crater, decreasing optical depth of the ejecta, and the evaporation of icy grains in the ejecta cloud. The dust moved with a typical velocity of 160 ms-1, suggesting acceleration of the dust by gas in the inner cometary coma. Images of the dust cloud taken several days after the impact show the effect of solar radiation pressure. The size distribution derived from an analysis of the radiation pressure is comparable to that commonly observed in cometary comae. The increase of the intensity of the OH emission due to the impact corresponds to a water production of (1.5-3)x10(+32) molecules. The dust production depends on the uncertain amount of large dust grains ejected by the impact, but the dust/gas ratio is likely to be larger than one. © 2009 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Item Type: Book section
DOI/Identification number: 10.1007/978-3-540-76959-0_4
Additional information: Unmapped bibliographic data: LA - English [Field not mapped to EPrints] J2 - ESO Astrophys. Symp. [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Germany [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Dipartimento di Astronomia and CISAS, Università di Padova, Padova, Italy [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - University of Paris 7, Paris, France [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía - CSIC, Spain [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Institute of Planetary Research, DLR, Germany [Field not mapped to EPrints] AD - Astrophysics Research Centre, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, United Kingdom [Field not mapped to EPrints] DB - Scopus [Field not mapped to EPrints]
Subjects: Q Science > QB Astronomy
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences
Depositing User: Stephen Lowry
Date Deposited: 08 Dec 2015 22:53 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:29 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/52295 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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