Specialist group therapy for psychological factors associated with firesetting: Evidence of a treatment effect from a non-randomized trial with male prisoners

Gannon, Theresa A. and Alleyne, Emma and Butler, Helen and Danby, Harriet and Kapoor, Aparna and Lovell, Tamsin and Mozova, Katarina and Spruin, Elizabeth and Tostevin, Tracey and Tyler, Nichola and Ó Ciardha, Caoilte (2015) Specialist group therapy for psychological factors associated with firesetting: Evidence of a treatment effect from a non-randomized trial with male prisoners. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 73 . pp. 42-51. ISSN 0005-7967. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2015.07.007) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2015.07.007

Abstract

Despite huge societal costs associated with firesetting, no standardized therapy has been developed to address this hugely damaging behavior. This study reports the evaluation of the first standardized CBT group designed specifically to target deliberate firesetting in male prisoners (the Firesetting Intervention Programme for Prisoners; FIPP). Fifty-four male prisoners who had set a deliberate fire were referred for FIPP treatment by their prison establishment and psychologically assessed at baseline, immediately post treatment, and three-months post treatment. Prisoners who were treatment eligible yet resided at prison establishments not identified for FIPP treatment were recruited as Treatment as Usual controls and tested at equivalent time-points. Results showed that FIPP participants improved on one of three primary outcomes (i.e., problematic fire interest and associations with fire), and made some improvement on secondary outcomes (i.e., attitudes towards violence and antisocial attitudes) post treatment relative to controls. Most notable gains were made on the primary outcome of fire interest and associations with fire and individuals who gained in this area tended to self-report more serious firesetting behavior. FIPP participants maintained all key improvements at three-month follow up. These outcomes suggest that specialist CBT should be targeted at those holding the most serious firesetting history.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre of Research & Education in Forensic Psychology
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology
Depositing User: Emma Alleyne
Date Deposited: 15 Nov 2015 18:06 UTC
Last Modified: 09 May 2017 13:40 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/51903 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Ó Ciardha, Caoilte: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5383-8403
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