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Resonance as a social phenomenon

Miller, Vincent (2015) Resonance as a social phenomenon. Sociological Research Online, 20 (2). pp. 9-19. ISSN 1360-7804. E-ISSN 1360-7804. (doi:10.5153/sro.3557) (Access to this publication is currently restricted. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

This paper is a theoretical investigation into the question of affinity and belonging in everyday life contexts. I argue that Sociology has tended to focus attention on the conceptual binaries of ‘individual/community’ or ‘individual/social structure’ when discussing experiences of inclusion, solidarity or belonging in social life. This has meant that such experiences are generally conceived in terms of ‘a part of’ or ‘apart from’. Such a focus has meant that incidents of belonging or affinity which lie between these extremes and which may be intense, intimate and meaningful, but at the same time fluid, ephemeral or tenuous tend to escape sociological analysis. Largely inspired by sociological phenomenology, but multi-disciplinary in nature, this paper will try to address this issue by positing ‘resonance’ as a useful concept by which sociologists and social scientists more generally, can engage with the more fluid forms of belonging and affinity achieved in everyday life contexts.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.5153/sro.3557
Uncontrolled keywords: resonance; everyday life; intimacy; anonymity; collective effervescence; communitas; Durkheim; affect; Schutz; Ingold
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Social Policy Sociology and Social Research > Sociology
Depositing User: Vince Miller
Date Deposited: 10 Nov 2015 12:19 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:19 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/51626 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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