Expanding the human-biometric sensor interaction model to identity claim scenarios

Elliott, Stephen J. and O’Connor, Kevin and Bartlow, Eric and Robertson, Joshua J. and Guest, Richard (2015) Expanding the human-biometric sensor interaction model to identity claim scenarios. In: IEEE International Conference on Identity, Security and Behavior Analysis (ISBA 2015). pp. 1-6. ISBN 978-1-4799-1974-1. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1109/ISBA.2015.7126362) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Official URL
http://doi.org/10.1109/ISBA.2015.7126362

Abstract

Biometric technologies represent a significant component of comprehensive digital identity solutions, and play an important role in crucial security tasks. These technologies support identification and authentication of individuals based on their physiological and behavioral characteristics. This has led many governmental agencies to choose biometrics as a supplement to existing identification schemes, most prominently ID cards and passports. Studies have shown that the success of biometric systems relies, in part, on how humans interact and accept such systems. In this paper, the authors build on previous work related to the Human-Biometric Sensor Interaction (HBSI) model and examine it with respect to the introduction of a token (e.g. an electronic passport or identity card) into the biometric system. The role of the imposter within an Identity Claim scenario has been integrated to expand the HBSI model into a full version, which is able to categorise potential False Claims and Attack Presentations.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Paper)
Uncontrolled keywords: biometrics, adaptation models, authentication, biological system modeling, fingerprint recognition, measurement, usability
Subjects: T Technology
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Engineering and Digital Arts > Image and Information Engineering
Depositing User: Tina Thompson
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2015 10:52 UTC
Last Modified: 08 Nov 2016 14:23 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50877 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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