Skip to main content

Parent–Child similarity in common and specific components of prejudice: The role of ideological attitudes and political discussion

Meeusen, Cecil, Dhont, Kristof (2015) Parent–Child similarity in common and specific components of prejudice: The role of ideological attitudes and political discussion. European Journal of Personality, 29 (6). pp. 585-598. ISSN 0890-2070. E-ISSN 1099-0984. (doi:10.1002/per.2011)

PDF - Publisher pdf
Restricted to Repository staff only
Contact us about this Publication Download (389kB)
[img]
PDF - Author's Accepted Manuscript
Download (550kB) Preview
[img]
Preview
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/per.2011

Abstract

Using a representative sample of Belgian adolescents (N=1530) and both their parents, we investigated the parent–child similarity in prejudice towards different out-groups and ideological attitudes (right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation). Contrary to previous studies, first, we distinguished between common and specific components of prejudice to test whether the parent–child similarity in one specific type of prejudice was symptomatic of parent–child similarity in prejudice towards out-groups in general. Second, we evaluated whether the parent–child similarity in common and specific components of prejudice was related to the parent–child similarity in ideological attitudes. Third, we investigated the moderating role of political discussion in the intergenerational framework of ideology and prejudice. Results indicated that parent–child similarity was particularly pronounced for the common rather than the specific component of prejudice and that the similarity in ideological attitudes was partly related to the similarity in the common component of prejudice. Finally, adolescents who discuss social and political issues more (versus less) frequently with their parents more strongly resembled their parents in the common component of prejudice and levels of authoritarianism. These results suggest that generalized prejudice runs in families and highlight politicization of the family as an important socialization mechanism.

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1002/per.2011
Uncontrolled keywords: intergenerational similarity;prejudice;authoritarianism;social dominance;political discussion
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Centre for the Study of Group Processes
Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Psychology > Social Psychology
Depositing User: Kristof Dhont
Date Deposited: 29 Sep 2015 08:09 UTC
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 16:03 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50636 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year