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Synthesis and characterization of polypyrrole-coated sulfur-rich latex particles: New synthetic mimics for sulfur-based micrometeorites

Fujii, Syuji, Burchell, Mark J., Armes, Steven P., Jeans, Richard, Devonshire, Robin, Warren, Samantha, McArthur, Sally L., Postberg, Frank, Srama, Ralf (2006) Synthesis and characterization of polypyrrole-coated sulfur-rich latex particles: New synthetic mimics for sulfur-based micrometeorites. Chemistry of Materials, 18 (11). pp. 2758-2765. ISSN 0897-4756. (doi:10.1021/cm0601741) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/cm0601741

Abstract

Polypyrrole (PPy) has been deposited from aqueous solution onto submicrometer-sized sulfur-rich poly[bis(4-vinylthiophenyl)sulfide] (PMPV) latex particles. The PMPV seed particles and resulting composite particles were extensively characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, helium pycnometry, Raman spectroscopy, and electrical conductivity measurements. Four-point probe measurements on pressed pellets indicate conductivities of around 6 x 10(-5) S cm(-1) for a polypyrrole loading of approximately 11.5%. This suggests a somewhat patchy, nonuniform polypyrrole overlayer, which is consistent with our Raman spectroscopy studies. Despite their relatively low conductivities, these polypyrrole-coated PMPV latexes can be accelerated up to hypervelocities (> 20 km s(-1)) using a high voltage (2 MV) van de Graaf instrument. In view of their high sulfur contents (ca. 28%), these new electrically conductive latexes are expected to be interesting synthetic mimics for understanding the behavior of sulfur-based micrometeorites, whose existence has been postulated by planetary scientists investigating signs of volcanic activity on one of Jupiter's moons (Io).

Item Type: Article
DOI/Identification number: 10.1021/cm0601741
Subjects: Q Science
Q Science > QB Astronomy
Q Science > QD Chemistry
Divisions: Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences
Faculties > Sciences > School of Physical Sciences > Centre for Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences
Depositing User: Mark Burchell
Date Deposited: 02 Sep 2008 13:00 UTC
Last Modified: 01 Aug 2019 10:30 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/5048 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
Burchell, Mark J.: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2680-8943
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