The role of stress in syllable monitoring

Arvaniti, Amalia and Rathcke, Tamara V (2015) The role of stress in syllable monitoring. In: 18th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 10-14 Aug 2015, SECC Glasgow, The University of Glasgow, Scotland, UK. (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

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Abstract

In a syllable monitoring experiment, Greek and English speakers (N = 20 per language) monitored for [ma] embedded in Greek real and nonce words; [ma] was word-initial, word-medial or word-final, and stressed, unstressed or rhythmically stressed. Both groups spotted stressed [ma] faster than unstressed [ma]; unstressed [ma] was spotted faster by Greek than English participants. Rhythmically stressed [ma] patterned with unstressed [ma] for both groups. Word category (real or nonce) did not affect latencies. These results show that stress played an important role whether participants were responding to unfamiliar (nonce) stimuli (Greeks) or processing in an altogether unfamiliar language with different stress requirements (English). The importance of stress did not depend on rhythm class, as has sometimes been argued, though familiarity with language did affect responses. The results do not support the view that processing is related to rhythm class and confirm that Greek makes only a binary stress distinction.

Item Type: Conference or workshop item (Proceeding)
Uncontrolled keywords: syllable monitoring, stress, Greek, English, rhythm class, rhythmic stress
Subjects: P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics
Divisions: Faculties > Humanities > School of European Culture and Languages > English Language and Linguistics
Depositing User: Amalia Arvaniti
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2015 13:50 UTC
Last Modified: 06 Oct 2016 09:23 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50283 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
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