The International Humanitarian Regime and Its Discontents: India's Challenge

Hammerstad, Anne (2015) The International Humanitarian Regime and Its Discontents: India's Challenge. The Round Table: The Commonwealth Journal of International Affairs, 104 (4). pp. 1-15. ISSN 0035-8533. E-ISSN 1474-029X. (doi:https://doi.org/10.1080/00358533.2015.1063846) (The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided)

The full text of this publication is not currently available from this repository. You may be able to access a copy if URLs are provided. (Contact us about this Publication)
Official URL
http://www.dx.doi.org/10.1080/00358533.2015.106384...

Abstract

In recent years, concerns over whether the humanitarian regime as we know it will survive a many-pronged challenge have spurred humanitarian organisations to embark on processes of soul-searching and innovation. With a steadily increasing aid budget and its more active and vocal role in development and humanitarian politics—and in global politics more generally—India has acquired the label of ‘emerging’ humanitarian actor. This article, however, shows that in many ways India has been a humanitarian pioneer, and connects the norms and values of the international humanitarian regime with India’s own philosophical, religious and democratic traditions. It also discusses how Indian policy-makers have critiqued the current United Nations-led international humanitarian regime and investigates how the government of an increasingly powerful and influential Commonwealth country from the South interacts with an international regime created in Europe. For many Indian policy-makers, current humanitarian practices are tainted by what they see as North American and European interventionist and highly political agendas in the South. The article concludes that while there is still a lot to be said for a global, multilateral humanitarian regime led by the United Nations, it need not be Western-biased, either in theory or in practice.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled keywords: Humanitarian politics, aid, cosmopolitanism, globalisation, humanitarianism, India, United Nations, Ministry of External Affairs, Sri Lanka, Maldives, Myanmar, Afghanistan, Narendra Modi
Subjects: J Political Science > JZ International relations
Divisions: Faculties > Social Sciences > School of Politics and International Relations > Conflict Analysis Research Centre
Depositing User: A. Hammerstad
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2015 17:50 UTC
Last Modified: 18 Aug 2015 07:45 UTC
Resource URI: https://kar.kent.ac.uk/id/eprint/50205 (The current URI for this page, for reference purposes)
  • Depositors only (login required):